?

Log in

No account? Create an account
entries friends calendar profile It's Me Previous Previous Next Next
The Autobiography of Russell
Life from a different perspective
zimzat
zimzat
Some things that occured to me
I was going to talk about how to we need to get rid of weeks (and daylight savings time for good measure), but I'm so outclassed it's not funny. *sigh*

(See comments for more on getting rid of weeks)

-----

"Hi, my name is Russell, and I'm a sexaholic."

-----

Anyway.... that's it.

Current Mood: crushed crushed
Current Music: "Promises" by Savage Garden

7 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
swanhart From: swanhart Date: August 16th, 2005 07:52 pm (UTC) (Link)
Daylight savings time makes sense from an energy conservation perspective, at least for most states.

Why would we want to get rid of weeks? How would we know when we are getting paid? :D
zimzat From: zimzat Date: August 16th, 2005 09:54 pm (UTC) (Link)
Most places that use energy, ie stores, highways, parking lots, and houses, have the lights and machines on regardless of if they're open during the day or night. You're not going to save much energy there, I think. As far as farmers go, from what I understand they go out at dawn (or pre-dawn) regardless of what time it actually is.

I want to get rid of weeks so we can get rid of this nonsense where everything closes on Sunday and sometimes even Saturday. In today's world of instant transactions, next day delivery, and fast food, it's increasingly frustrating for everything to grind to a stop.

As far as how you'd know when you get paid, your job would set up a system for getting paid by a mod of the day of the year (Thinking about that, though, why don't jobs simply pay after every work day).

I was doing some calculations earlier and since there are three-hundred and sixty-five days to the year, a work period could consist of four days on and one day off, as well as a half day of time off each period. This would encourage employees to take time off as they need and be flexible about their schedule. To keep employees from taking too much time off at the same time mandate that they can't have more than, say, five days of time off allocated at a time. For employers to schedule work and time off, employees would have to give notice at least five days in advance. For extended vacations you could allow people to bankroll their time off into vacation time, however you have to give at least ten to twenty days advanced notice before using it.

To work religious service into the work schedule either have the churches hold more than one service (mostly lazy people, anyway) or allow people to use that half day of time off each work period to get off early some days.

Another advantage of smaller work periods is that employees wouldn't have as much consecutive time dealing with their jobs and getting frustrated and they'd have down time more often to unwind.

If work periods were scheduled correctly a business could stay open 24/7 or every day of the year. Holidays could happen on exact days of the year.

The biggest problem I can see is when it comes to schools, but then isn't it about time the school system was reorganized anyway?
swanhart From: swanhart Date: August 16th, 2005 11:03 pm (UTC) (Link)
Most places that use energy, ie stores, highways, parking lots, and houses, have the lights and machines on regardless of
if they're open during the day or night. You're not going to save much energy there, I think. As far as farmers go, from what I understand they go out at dawn (or pre-dawn) regardless of what time it actually is.


Contrary to popular belief, DST has nothing to do with farmers.

Between 25 and 30 percent of the electricity used at home is for lighting and small appliances. The most electricity is used after dark, when most people turn on their lights. I just so happens that lightbulbs are the thing in most households that consume the most electricity. By making it get darker, later, DST conserves energy. It also encourages children to stay out later.

The amount of energy per household that is saved is relatively small, but those savings compound each other, and result in mass energy savings. Some studies have shown that DST energy savings can be as much as 1% reduction in total consumption per day.

DST isn't observed in all areas of the country. Arizona doesn't observe it. That is because in Arizona the energy savings for turning off lights are outweighed by the cooling effect of the setting sun, which reduces the need for air conditioning after sunset hours.

I want to get rid of weeks so we can get rid of this nonsense where everything closes on Sunday and sometimes even >Saturday. In today's world of instant transactions, next day delivery, and fast food, it's increasingly frustrating for >everything to grind to a stop.

Well, if everybody worked alone, then that would work just fine. However, because people have to work together, have meetings, etc, a work week with specific hours is pretty much required. I can't think of many places that are closed on Sunday, but I guess it depends on where you live.

As far as how you'd know when you get paid, your job would set up a system for getting paid by a mod of the day of the year >(Thinking about that, though, why don't jobs simply pay after every work day).

Because the amount of paperwork that would generate alone would be a huge burden. And companies earn interest on the money in their bank accounts. They earn additional money just by deferring your pay by a bit

I was doing some calculations earlier and since there are three-hundred and sixty-five days to the year, a work period could consist of four days on and one day off, as well as a half day of time off each period. This would encourage employees to take time off as they need and be flexible about their schedule. To keep employees from taking too much time off at the same time mandate that they can't have more than, say, five days of time off allocated at a time. For employers to schedule work and time off, employees would have to give notice at least five days in advance. For extended vacations you could allow people to bankroll their time off into vacation time, however you have to give at least ten to twenty days advanced notice before using it.

Some years have 366 days, but anyway...
People are stupid. They can't calculate their existing vacation time as it is. Most of the rest of the world practices a 30-35 hour work week. I personally prefer to work 4x10s and have a three day weekend.

Another advantage of smaller work periods is that employees wouldn't have as much consecutive time dealing with their jobs and getting frustrated and they'd have down time more often to unwind.

It would lead to lower productivity.

If work periods were scheduled correctly a business could stay open 24/7 or every day of the year. Holidays could happen on exact days of the year.

But who needs the accounting department to be open at 3am in the morning? There just isn't enough work to justify staffing an entire organization 24/7.

The biggest problem I can see is when it comes to schools, but then isn't it about time the school system was reorganized anyway?
zimzat From: zimzat Date: August 16th, 2005 11:53 pm (UTC) (Link)
Everyone is bound to be working at around the same time at some point so meetings can still go on. For that matter, Wal-Mart has their employees come in for meetings even if they're off, but they do pay them for the time they're at the meeting. Mail and packages aren't delivered on Sunday. Most businesses in the area aren't open on Sunday, or any government job for that matter.

I highly disagree about the paperwork needed to pay employees every day. But you may have a point with the thing about holding onto employee money, but I do disagree with it because it sounds like the employer is taking advantage of their labor.

How do you figure it would lead to lower productivity? Less stress sounds like more productivity, not less.

Someone like GIECO would need the accounting department open at 3am, although maybe not with the same number of people at 3pm. Or they could ration the work over all of them rather than pile it up over night and deal with it in the morning. But like I said, maybe not 24/7 but at least every day.

*grumbles* Fine, it was a stupid idea anyway. Everyone is too stubborn to even consider changing status quo en mass.
mrtrblmkr1 From: mrtrblmkr1 Date: August 26th, 2005 06:16 pm (UTC) (Link)
I agree, my company used Wal-mart's strategy, worked quite well
since it's the summer and most employees are/were high school students
(ie. they really have nothing planned if they're working the summer)

I agree in disagreeing about paperwork. Where I work, we use a debit
card payment system. No paperwork whatsoever. All money (monies) is
transferred to a debit card in our possesion to which we simply use as
a debit card... nothing special, and all our 'paperwork' is electronic,
we read it online, for those of us who do read it.

I, however, agree that it will lower productivity. If I were given that
much time off, and mind you, I am, I would be way too cozy in my time off
zone, leave me be I say.


Apart from reorganizing the entire calendar, reorganizing the school
system could be quite fun. I say base all our practices, minus a few
things, on China's or Japan's educational system. Students stay in
school year-round and such, that I'd definitely love.
From: inamicus Date: August 18th, 2005 03:36 am (UTC) (Link)
Some years have 366 days, but anyway...

366.24219 days, but anyway

you started it.
zimzat From: zimzat Date: August 18th, 2005 03:46 am (UTC) (Link)
Umm, actually, I thought it was 365.24219, which is where some years get 366 days instead of 365.
7 comments or Leave a comment